Enzo Mari

Driven by the belief that designing is a deep drive of every human being, Enzo Mari (Novara, 1932) experienced a period of self-training until he attended the Brera Academy in Milan, where he stood out for his scenography projects and games for children, and started to support himself with his work. Fully convinced that a project should originate beautiful objects for common people, Mari made his best-known creations during the '60s: among the most significant are the objects for Danese (vases, bowls, ashtrays), the graphic projects for Olivetti, the seats for Driade and Zanotta, the tools for Alessi and the “Aggregato” lamp for Artemide. His utopian approach to design, which identifies the designer as an interpreter of human needs and a creator of useful objects outside the market trends, made him one of the most ingenious and innovative designers of the 20th century. His work is celebrated by prestigious museums such as the MoMa, which include Mari’s objects in their permanent collections.

Get inspired

Gio Ponti

Piero Fornasetti

Fratelli Castiglioni

Joe Colombo

Nanda Vigo

Ettore Sottsass

Marco Zanuso

Luigi Caccia Dominioni

Ico Parisi

Charles & Ray Eames

Gae Aulenti

Pietro Chiesa

Vico Magistretti

Giotto Stoppino

Tobia Scarpa

Carlo Nason

Marcello Cuneo

Vittorio Dassi

Paolo Buffa

Max Ingrand

Gastone Rinaldi

Pia Guidetti Crippa

Gaetano Pesce

Richard Sapper

Ingo Maurer

Gabriella Crespi

Paul McCobb

Paul Tuttle

Nendo

Alvaro Siza

Carl Jacob Jucker

Ernesto Basile

Sergio Mazza

Osvaldo Borsani

Oscar Torlasco

Le Corbusier

Willy Rizzo

Gaetano Sciolari

Carlo De Carli

Enzo Mari

Angelo Lelli

Gino Sarfatti