Storytelling

The lover's eye

Today we celebrate the feast of all lovers. It seems that its origins are due to the Christian martyr Valentine - sanctified in 496 AD by Pope Gelasius I - who became protector of lovers after giving money to a girl to bring it as a dowry to the family of his beloved, who otherwise would never have accepted the wedding. A great gesture of love for a matter of true love.

Today we celebrate the feast of all lovers. It seems that its origins are due to the Christian martyr Valentine - sanctified in 496 AD by Pope Gelasius I - who became protector of lovers after giving money to a girl to bring it as a dowry to the family of his beloved, who otherwise would never have accepted the wedding. A great gesture of love for a matter of true love.

Taking its cue from this day, IntOndo tells you the story of an object that in its smallness collects the uncontainable love of lovers. It is a miniature painting of the eye of the beloved. These small miniatures that reproduce the part of the body that is the mirror of our soul were widespread at the end of '700 and are now collectibles. A showcase full of these mysterious looks can be admired at the Philadelphia and Cleveland Art Museums as well as at the Victoria&Albert Museum.

Each of these works tells a very intimate story between two lovers such as the one that in 1785 led Prince George of Wales to send a miniature of his right eye to his beloved, Maria Anne Fitzherbert, who had escaped from England to avoid disputes due to their different religions.

The small painting with the eye of the future King of England, six years younger than her, must have breached Maria Anne's heart, who agreed to marry him in secret. Shortly afterwards she also had her eyes miniaturized and included them in a pendant to be given to her beloved. Their story was never accepted and the marriage was soon broken, but wherever George was he could open his medallion to receive his beloved's secret gaze.


Does this seem like a story from another era? In our opinion, it is not so far from today's "selfish" obsessions, which lack any romanticism at all. Enough with chocolates and hearts, let's look to the past to make a gesture of true love. Our catalogue is full of inspiration, for example, do you realize that we have a very original 19th century coded canopy? What better way do you have to keep an eye on your lover? Not to mention the very personal dance booklet  with which to note down and remember a special evening like this Valentine's Day and many others that will come.